Because I Can Series: Book Two, Saturation

Hey Folks,

This is the second post in the “Because I Can” series about making Blurb books in an edition of ONE. Yes, you heard and read correctly. I’m making books with the intention of capping the print run at ONE book. Why? BECAUSE I CAN. We have really only had this option since about 2006, yet photographers ALREADY seem to take this for granted. I know, there is so much change on a daily basis that we are perpetually thirsty for the new, always wanting the latest and greatest. I get it. However, I for one cannot overlook the power in having the ability to make a single book. I wrote about this in a previous post, so if you want the background then go back and have a look. I pulled a selection from that prior post to set the table for this one. This is a series people. I’ve made at least seven books already and have eighteen more in the pipeline.
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Several months ago I got a call from a photographer who was asking me technical questions about color management. Now for me I equate color management with that gymnastics thing with the ribbon. I know there is an audience for it, but no matter how long I try attempting to comprehend its real meaning I always remain puzzled. Color management, if you are going to print anything, is wildly important, no doubt, but it’s just that I find it really boring. And, I think if you are too fixated on color management you will miss the idea of making the book in the first place. I equate this scenario to the famous Bruce Lee quote of “It is like a finger pointing to the moon. Concentrate on the finger and you will miss all that heavenly glory”
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So, after this phone conversation, and after my urging the photographer to calibrate, use the ICC profile and to keep monitor brightness in mind, I realized my good intentions had been lost on someone still occupied almost entirely with color. I hung up the phone, turned to my wife and said, “I don’t think he gets it.” After further consideration I began to realize that perhaps I needed to be an example. If I MADE things that illustrated my point then perhaps the idea of the final product would outweigh the things that might keep people from feeling all that heavenly book glory. I made a decision right then and there to make ANY book that came to mind, NO MATTER HOW SILLY, STUPID, RIDICULOUS OR UNREALISTIC THAT BOOK IS. Am I selling these books? No. Am I putting them forth in the world and telling everyone how great they are? No. Are these the only books I’m making? No. But let me tell you something very critical. These just might be the most important books I’ve ever made.
When I quit working as a photographer at the end of 2010, unexpectedly, an entirely new world opened up to me. The same exact thing happened the minute I made the first book in this series (The RGB Book). Talk about a lightbulb going off. And it isn’t just me. I’ve done seven of these books so far, have a list of eighteen more I’m working on now, some good, some silly, some I don’t know what, and I’ve also shown them at some of the presentations I’ve done. Each time, after showing these books, I’ve had photographers come up and say, “Seeing those books jarred something loose.” This makes me feel like my idea of being an example was perhaps the right move.

By the way, if anyone out there is experimenting in this same vein then please let me know. I’ve seen some prime examples over the past few years and would love to see more.

Something Personal This Way Comes

You ever get the feeling that we are living in a parallel universe? I’m not entirely sure what that means, but I think it might be happening. We all blaze forward simultaneously racing on a path of security, meaning and direction and yet behind the scenes there lurks this feeling that someone, or something, is looking over our shoulder. Things connect.

So a few weeks ago I wrote a post about receiving a letter in the mail, a real, honest-to-goodness, paper letter. This letter came from Los Angeles based painter/photographer Michael Napper. The post “Art in the Mail” was about framing the letter because it was so beautiful and because it was personal and only for little old me.

Sunday night I returned from the Palm Springs Photo Festival and checked my mail. Inside, buried amid the junk mail, bills, spiderwebs and dust was a letter. This was no “regular” letter. This letter was fat, somewhat square and immediately made me toss aside the rest of the stack. This letter had handwriting on it. Real, personal handwriting. And this letter had stamps, really cool stamps with “Canada” on them.

Needless to say I was intrigued. What I found inside completely and utterly made my day. Inside was the “book” and prints you see in the first photograph. It turns out that during my workshop in Victoria BC someone named Paul Romaniuk was in the audience. Paul wrote a review of my lecture, a damn good review, and we subsequently kept in touch. Paul saw my post about “Art in the Mail” and something clicked. The result is what you see here. These images don’t do his book justice, but I think this is also on point with the message of this post.


As photographers we are products of learned behavior and our photo-environment. Heck, I know I surely am. I went to photojournalism school. I studied the masters, or some of them anyway. And much of what I did I did because I thought that was what I was supposed to do. Well, over the past ten years, I’ve been trying to unlearn as much as I possibly can. There is absolutely nothing wrong with what I learned, but I know now that range, or angle or direction may or may not be the right one for me. So, now I must find my own path. One of the things I was taught was about the book. Yes, the all-powerful book.


The book must be a monograph.
The book must be published by a traditional publisher.(Only thing that will give you cred.)
The book must be large.
The book must be entirely serious.
The book must be traditional.

Again, nothing wrong with these ideas, but they are simple not accurate, at least not all the time. A book can be SO many things. A book can be almost anything. Receiving Paul’s book was EVERY BIT as interesting and powerful as going into a bookstore and buying the latest, greatest, enormous coffee-table book. It really was. And there were prints too! Opening the letter made me feel like I’d been told a secret that nobody else knew. I felt like Paul sat at home with me personally on his mind and built this thing. That is VERY powerful.

Last week at the festival I had a long conversation with a photographer I really admire. We looked at his Blurb book, a large one, 12×12, Proline paper, etc. His book is beautiful and has been very well received. Shortly after I showed him my “best” book, a 5×8 inch, softcover book with eleven images and twenty pages total. He said to me, “Never in my wildest dreams would I have thought to make a book like that.”

This was music to my ears. This is it people. We can do anything we can dream up. We don’t need permission. We don’t need a note from mom and dad. We just need time for critical thought, an idea and the will to see it to fruition. We might also have to unlearn a few things. Paul’s book you see here was yet another reminder of that. This book, and prints, will go into my collection and will grow old with me…if I make it that long.

Getting something like this is like a shot of creative adrenaline. Time for us to ride the wave.

Thanks Paul.

New Release: Homework

“Homework” is the first limited production book in the Milnor Pictures collection.

Each book will be signed, numbered and will include a 10×10 print.

I’ve always been driven by the idea of travel. These days it seems that everyone is on the go. The far reaches of the globe have chain stores, water parks and ultimate fighting. Most of my workshop students have been to Everest base camp and at least two have walked on the moon.
But I got to thinking. I’m supposed to be a photographer right? That means I should be able to shoot pictures in a paper bag. This was the idea that created “Homework.” Right here. Right now. I don’t need anything else, anywhere else. I should be able to walk outside and make something damnit.
So, here it is.

FOREWARD

wanderlust
n 1: very strong or irresistible impulse to travel [syn:
wanderlust, itchy feet]

Thesaurus words for “wanderlust”:
Wanderjahr, afoot and lighthearted, bumming, discursion,
divagation, drifting, errantry, flitting, gadding, hoboism,
itineracy, itinerancy, nomadism, peregrination, pererration,
ramble, rambling, roam, roaming, rove, roving, straying, traipsing,
vagabondage, vagabondia, vagabondism, vagrancy, wandering,
wayfaring

home
n 1: one’s own dwelling place; the house in which one lives;
esp., the house in which one lives with his family; the
habitual abode of one’s family; also, one’s birthplace.

Thesaurus words for “home”:
a better place, abode, cradle, digs, domicile,dwelling,
habitat, haunt, homestead,household,living quarters, refuge,
residence, residency, shelter

If you are interested in this book you can have it shipped to me so I can sign it, number it and include the print.